THE HPV VIRUS

  • Extremely common. More than 70%, or two-thirds of healthy Americans are infected with HPV [1] [2].
    [1] Steinbach A, Riemer AB, Immune evasion mechanisms of human papillomavirus: An update. Int J Cancer. 2017 Sep 2. Doi: 10.1002/ijc.31027. [Epub ahead of print]
    [2] Studer L, Cardoza-Favarato G  Human Papillomavirus. StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2017-2017 Aug 1.

  • Yes. Most of the time the immune system clears the virus within a few years.  However, in about 10%-20% of the cases, the immune system cannot clear the virus.  In these cases the virus persists in the body for years, even decades.  These are the most dangerous cases [1]. 

    [1] Shanmugasundaram S, You J. Targeting Persistent Human Papillomavirus Infection. Viruses. 2017 Aug 18;9(8). Pii: E229.

  • There are no drugs that clear the virus. The only treatment proven to clear the virus is the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin [1].

    [1] Polansky H, Itzkovitz E, Javaherian A. 2017. Human papillomavirus (HpV): systemic treatment with Gene-eden-Vir/Novirin safely and effectively clears virus. Drug Design, Development and Therapy, Volume:11 Pages 575-583.

  • Yes. Latent viruses can still cause disease. High concentrations of these viruses can cause cancer, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and many more [1].

    [1] Shanmugasundaram S, You J. Targeting Persistent Human Papillomavirus Infection. Viruses. 2017 Aug 18;9(8). Pii: E229.

HPV INFECTION

THE HPV VACCINE

  • There are no drugs that get rid of the HPV virus. The only treatment that clears HPV is the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin [1].          

    [1] Polansky H, Itzkovitz E, Javaherian A. 2017. Human papillomavirus (HpV): systemic treatment with Gene-eden-Vir/novirin safely and effectively clears virus. Drug Design, Development and Therapy, Volume:11 Pages 575-583.

  • Yes. The HPV vaccination does not protect you from all forms of HPV. In addition, the vaccine cannot protect you if you had already contracted HPV before the time of the vaccination [1].

    [1] Sawaya GF, Huchko MJ Cervical Cancer Screening. Med Clin North Am. 2017 Jul;101(4):743-753. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2017.03.006. Epub 2017 Apr 21.

  • For the HPV vaccine to be most effective, the series of shots should be given prior to exposure to HPV. There is no reason to wait to vaccinate until teens reach puberty or start having sex. Preteens should receive all recommended doses of the HPV vaccine series before they begin any type of sexual activity. [1]

    [1] Saslow, D, Andrews, K, Manassaram-Baptiste, D, Loomer, L, Lam, K, Fisher-Borne, M , Smith, R and Fontham, E. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jul;36(7):627-630.

  • HPV vaccine was tested in people age 9 through 26 years. Although the vaccine has been tested in women age 27 through 45 years and found to be safe, data on the effectiveness of the vaccine in this age group was inconclusive, mainly because many of the participants in the trial had already been infected with HPV types included in the vaccine. [1]

    [1] Saslow, D, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jul;36(7):627-630.

  • HPV vaccine is an inactivated (not live) vaccine. [1]

     

    [1] Saslow, D, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jul;36(7):627-630

  • This vaccine is given as a shot in the muscle. [1]

    [1] Saslow, D, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jul;36(7):627-630.

  • According to Gardasil’s Web site (www.gardasil.com), it has not been established exactly how long the vaccine’s protection lasts. However, different studies have shown that the vaccine’s protection against HPV provides general safety and effective protection from HPV 6-, 11-, 16-, 18- related genital warts and cervical dysplasia for about 6 years [1]. So, although there is yet insufficient data to confirm that protection is maintained, the HPV vaccine continues to be generally safe and well tolerated up to 6 years following vaccination [2].

    [1] Luna, J, Plata, M, Gonzalez, M, Correa, A, Maldonado, I, Nossa, C, Radley, D,  Vuocolo, S, Haupt, R and Saah, A. Long-Term Follow-up Observation of the Safety, Immunogenicity, and Effectiveness of Gardasil™ in Adult Women. 2013 Dec. Plos.

    [2] Saah, A. An evaluation of the long-term effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safety of Gardasil in previously vaccinated women. 2011. BMJ Journals. Sexually Transmitted Infections, v87 nSuppl 1:A357

  • If your boyfriend is under the age of 21, getting vaccinated will reduce his risk of HPV. However, the vaccination does not protect against all forms of HPV [1].

    [1] https://blogs.cdc.gov/publichealthmatters/2016/01/5-things-you-might-not-know-about-human-papillomavirus/

  • The HPV vaccine is most effective when given at age 11-12. However, women can be vaccinated until the age of 26, and men until the age of 21. The vaccine is not recommended if you are already infected with the HPV [1].

    [1] Saslow, D, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jul;36(7):627-630.

  • There is little doubt that, overall, the vaccine has saved many people from HPV, and possibly cervical cancer. Since the HPV vaccine became available in 2006, it has been regularly monitored by the FDA and the CDC to make sure it is effective and safe [1]. According to the scientific literature, in most cases, side effects of the vaccine are mild [2].  However, a large number of reports have been shared to authorities and the media, showing serious adverse effects after the vaccine [3].

    There have been cases where girls have suffered extreme health reactions that their parents believe are associated with the vaccine. Some of these girls suffer chronic pain, are confined to a wheelchair, or rely on feeding tubes. Some doctors say that these girls had pre-existing conditions that had nothing to do with the vaccine, while others see a direct connection to the vaccine [4].

    Before you decide to get vaccinated, or vaccinate your children, do your research. Estimate the risk. Ensure that you or your child is not allergic to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Understand the best steps to take if you or your child has a bad reaction to the vaccine. Some parents complained that the HPV vaccine consent form they signed did not display full information about the risks of the HPV vaccination. You can find a complete list of these risks in the references below. Another option that has shown to be 100% safe and effective, is to take the herbal Gene-Eden VIR/Novirin, instead of dealing with the complicated controversy around the HPV vaccine.

     

    [1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). BGenital HPV Infection: Fact Sheet.\

    [2] De Vincenzo, R, Conte,C, Ricci,C, Scambia, G, Capelli,G. (2014). Long-term efficacy and safety of human papillomavirus vaccination. Int J Womens Health. 6: 999–1010.

    [3] Gallagher, P. (2015, May). Thousands of teenage girls report feeling seriously ill after routine school vaccination. The Independent.

    [4] Rebecca E. Chandler, Kristina Juhlin, Jonas Fransson. Ola CasterI. Ralph Edwards G. Niklas Norén. (2017). Current Safety Concerns with Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: A Cluster Analysis of Reports in VigiBase. Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 81–90

HPV, GENITAL WARTS AND CANCER

HPV TREATMENTS

  • First, cryotherapy is NOT a cure for HPV. However, it can be used to get rid of genital warts and abnormal tissues in the cervix. The procedure involves your doctor placing a very cold chemical on the area in question. This causes the abnormal cells to freeze off, and allows healthy cells to grow in their place. Side effects include bleeding at the freeze site, blisters, infection, permanent hair loss, loss of feeling in the skin, darkening of the skin, and scarring [1] [2].

    [1] AN Abdullah, M Walzman, A Wade Treatment of external genital warts comparing cryotherapy (liquid nitrogen) and trichloracetic acid. Sex Transm Dis., 20 (1993), pp. 344-345.

    [2] SA Bashi. Cryotherapy versus podophyllin in the treatment of genital warts.Int J Dermatol., 24 (1985), pp. 535-536

  • LEEP is not a cure for HPV, but it can help remove the HPV abnormal growths. However, it does not prevent the growths from happening again. The procedure involves removing the pre-cancerous tissue using an electric wire [1] [2].

    [1] Ali Baloglu, Dilek UysalIncim, Bezircioglu Merve, Bicer Ayşegul Inci. Residual and recurrent disease rates following LEEP treatment in high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, July 2010, Volume 282, Issue 1, pp 69–73

    [2] Luı́s Otávio Sarian, Sophie F.M Derchain, Liliana A.A Andrade, Júlia Tambascia, Sirlei Siani Morais, Kari JSyrjänen. HPV DNA test and Pap smear in detection of residual and recurrent disease following loop electrosurgical excision procedure of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Gynecologic Oncology. Volume 94, Issue 1, July 2004, Pages 181-186

  • Common side effects include pain, cramping, abnormal vaginal discharge, and discharge/spotting for up to 3 weeks. In addition, sexual intercourse should be avoided for 3 weeks following the procedure [1].

    [1] Nancy Santesso et al. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of benefits and harms of cryotherapy, LEEP, and cold knife conization to treat cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Vol 132, Issue 3. March 2016. Pp. 266-271.

  • Anal warts can be removed by surgery, topical medicine, or cryotherapy. No matter which treatment method you choose, it is important to deal with anal warts as soon as possible. If left untreated, anal warts can multiply or increase the risk of anal cancer [1].

    [1] Karl R Beutner & AlexFerenczy. Therapeutic Approaches to Genital Warts. The American Journal of Medicine. Volume 102, Issue 5, Supplement 1, 5 May 1997, Pages 28-37.

  • Yes. Most women are unaware that they can be tested for HPV along with regular Pap smear. The test can be done with the same swab taken during the Pap smear test. This method is called co-testing, and is recommended for women 30 years and older [1].

    [1] https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/basic_info/screening.htm

  • Although treating recurring genital warts can indeed be a frustrating process, it is still not advised to attempt to cut them off at home. Any attempt to operate on oneself can result in permanent disfigurement or injuries. Genital warts must always be treated by a certified professional.

  • HPV is a virus. This means that someone who is infected with the HPV is hosting the virus within their body. In some cases, the immune system is too weak to clear the virus, and the virus remains in the body for life [1].  The damage caused by the virus, or the immune system while attempting to clear it, in a specific area of the body, is known as a symptom. Symptoms of HPV include genital warts, sores, and pain in the genital area. While symptoms can be relieved by removing or killing the virus in the specific area, the virus still remains in other parts of the body. This means that the virus is likely to attack again, and symptoms will develop. A cure is therefore a complete clearance of the virus everywhere in body [2].

    [1]https://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM554428.pdf

    [2] https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/hpv.htm

HPV, PREGNANCY AND MOTHERHOOD

  • The HPV by itself should not affect one’s ability to get pregnant. But in some cases, having HPV can increase the risk of developing precancerous or cancerous cells in the cervix, which could affect both fertility and the ability to carry a baby to term. [1]

    [1] Malinova M. Human papillomavirus infection and pregnancy. Akush Ginekol (Sofiia). 2015; 54 Suppl 2:14-8. Bulgarian.

  • It’s possible but uncommon to transmit the virus through genital contact without penetration, through oral sex, or by touching the genitals. There is growing evidence that HPV infection is possible through non-sexual routes like mother to-child transmission in the perinatal period. There is also recent evidence that an infected mother can transmit HPV to her newborn during pregnancy, at delivery, perinatal period or later. Even so, there is insufficient evidence to recommend the generalization of cesarean section for all HPV DNA-positive mothers. [1]

    [1] Malinova M. Human papillomavirus infection and pregnancy. Akush Ginekol (Sofiia). 2015; 54 Suppl 2:14-8. Bulgarian.

  • HPV DNA has been detected in the oral cavity of infants and breast cancer tissue, suggesting its vertical transmission through maternal milk. So, evidence shows that HPV infection through maternal milk may occur, but its likelihood is low. [1]

    [1] Louvanto K, Sarkola M, Rintala M, Syrjänen K, Grenman S, Syrjänen S. (2017). Breast Milk Is a Potential Vehicle for Human Papillomavirus Transmission to Oral Mucosa of the Spouse.  Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jan 16.

  • Even though there is no indication that the vaccine could cause harm to you or your unborn baby, it is recommended that you wait until you deliver to get the remaining doses of the vaccine [1]

    [1] Louvanto K, et al. Breast Milk Is a Potential Vehicle for Human Papillomavirus Transmission to Oral Mucosa of the Spouse.  Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jan 16.

HPV AND INSURANCE

  • First see a doctor for an official diagnosis. Many areas offer free testing, search the internet for free STD clinic and the name of your city to find the one closest to you. If you are infected, the clinic can advise you on further treatment. Be open with them about your finances, as this is the best way to receive helpful advice.

    You can also use the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin to clear your HPV infection. Genital warts are caused by HPV, so the treatment will clear the warts and the virus in your body. You should take the treatment for 1 year.

    If you would like to apply for government health insurance, you can do it here: https://www.healthcare.gov

  • Many health insurance plans cover vaccines recommended for children and adolescents. The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program provides free vaccines to children and adolescents younger than 19 years of age, who are Medicaid-eligible, American Indian, or Alaska Native, uninsured, or receiving care in a Federally Qualified Health Clinic or Rural Health Center. This includes boys as well as girls. For adults, if you’re not certain about your healthcare coverage, contact your health insurance plan for further information. If you don’t have health insurance or if your plan doesn’t cover this vaccine, ask your doctor or your local health department how you can obtain this vaccine [1].

    [1] (http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4207.pdf)

HPV, SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY

  • Yes. HPV vaccine is recommended for men and women regardless of their sexual orientation. [1]

    [1] Quinn, G, Sanchez, J, Sutton, S, Vadaparampil, S, Nguyen, G, Green, L, Kanetsky, P, Schabath, M. Cancer and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, and Queer/Questioning Populations (LGBTQ). CA Cancer J Clin. 2015 Sep; 65(5): 384–400.

  • Yes. HPV can be transmitted through any intimate skin to skin contact. Penetration is not required to spread the HPV virus. The virus is most commonly spread between women by genital to genital contact, touching an infected person’s genitals, or sharing unsanitized sex toys [1].

    [1] Rankow, Elizabeth J., and Irene Tessaro. “Cervical cancer risk and Papanicolaou screening in a sample of lesbian and bisexual women.” Journal of Family Practice, Aug. 1998, p. 139+. Academic OneFile, Accessed 1 Oct. 2017.

  • Yes. Routine HPV vaccination is recommended for transgender persons as for all adolescents. Transgender persons should be vaccinated through age 26 years. It is also important to do the necessary routine tests. For example, a person with male reproductive organs, but identifies as a woman, may forego prostate screening or avoid addressing prostate-related symptoms. Or, a person with female reproductive organs, who identifies as a man, should still do their regular Pap smear. [1]

    [1] Quinn, G, et al. Cancer and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, and Queer/Questioning Populations (LGBTQ). CA Cancer J Clin. 2015 Sep; 65(5): 384–400.

  • Although there is no approved test for men to know their “HPV status,” most HPV infections resolve without causing any problems. The problems caused by HPV in men can include genital warts, anal and penile cancers, or cancers of the oropharynx. You could check them yourself by paying attention to the following:

    Genital warts – If you notice abnormalities in the area of your penis, scrotum or anus, such as warts or blisters, see your healthcare provider.

    Penile cancers – There are currently no screening tests, but early signs can include color changes or build-up or thickening of the tissue.

    Anal cancers – Gay, bisexual, and HIV-positive men may consider annual screening. Although it is not a formal recommendation, research shows that these men are at higher risk.

    [1] Meites, E,  Gorbach, P,  Gratzer, B,  Panicker, G,  Steinau, M, Collins, T,  Parrish, A,  Randel, C, McGrath, M,  Carrasco, S,  Moore, J, Zaidi, A, Braxton, J,  Kerndt, P,  Unger, E,  Crosby, R, Markowitz, L. Monitoring for Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Impact Among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men—United States, 2012–2014. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, Volume 214, Issue 5, 1 September 2016, Pages 689–696

  • Studies show that the prevalence of anal cancer is 34 times as common among men who have sex with men compared to the majority population. However, anal cancer is rarely discussed. The HPV and Anal Cancer Foundation identifies several risk factors for Anal Cancer, including HPV, which is widely understood to be sexually transmitted through skin-to-skin contact, including during anal sex with or without condom usage. Receptive partners during anal sex and anyone with a weakened immune system, including people who are HIV+ are at increased risk for anal cancer. There is a growing awareness of the need for anal Pap tests. [1]

    [1] Meites, E,  et al. Monitoring for Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Impact Among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men—United States, 2012–2014. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, Volume 214, Issue 5, 1 September 2016, Pages 689–696